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RPM Rational Process Models
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NBM Nonparametric Bayesian Models
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By Lewandowsky, S.
CEIL
Griffiths, T. L., Lewandowsky, S., & Kalish, M. L. (2013). The effects of cultural transmission are modulated by the amount of information transmitted. Cognitive Science, 37, 953-967. (pdf)
PR
S&C
Little, D., Lewandowsky, S., & Griffiths, T. L. (2012). A Bayesian model of rule induction in Raven's progressive matrices. Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. (pdf)
PR
CEIL
Lewandowsky, S., Griffiths, T. L., & Kalish, M. L. (2009). The wisdom of individuals: Exploring peoples knowledge about everyday events using iterated learning. Cognitive Science, 33, 969-998. (pdf)
CEIL
Griffiths, T. L., Kalish, M. L., & Lewandowsky, S. (2008). Theoretical and experimental evidence for the impact of inductive biases on cultural evolution. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 363, 3503-3514. (pdf)
CEIL
Smith, K., Kalish, M. L., Griffiths, T. L., & Lewandowsky, S. (2008). Cultural transmission and the evolution of human behaviour. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 363, 3469-3476. (pdf)
CEIL
Kalish, M. L., Griffiths, T. L., & Lewandowsky, S. (2007). Iterated learning: Intergenerational knowledge transmission reveals inductive biases. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 14, 288-294. (pdf)
S&C
Lewandowsky, S., Kalish, M., & Griffiths, T. L. (2000). Competing strategies in categorization: Expediency and resistance to knowledge restructuring. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26, 1666-1684. (pdf)

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